Epigenetic pathways may lead Thomas to cancer cure

The path to discovering a cure for breast cancer is fraught with twists and turns, but Douglas Thomas, PhD believes he may be traveling on the right road. Thomas, University of Illinois Cancer Center member and associate professor of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy in the UIC College of Pharmacy, is working to identify epigenetic pathways that control specific phenotypes in cancer cells to learn how they become drug resistant, with the goal of…

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Haas trying to catch lung cancer earlier rather than later

Lung cancer is the leading cause of deaths related to cancer in the United States, but Kevin Haas envisions a future when so many lives aren’t lost each year due to the disease. “We have hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of technology today and diagnostic yields for pulmonary nodules or spots on the lung is only about 70 percent,” said Haas, MD, University of Illinois Cancer Center member and assistant professor of…

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So far, First time’s a charm for Tonetti’s initial clinical trial

Debra Tonetti’s first clinical trial has not gone the way she anticipated. It’s gone much better. Tonetti, PhD, a University of Illinois Cancer Center member, associate professor of pharmacology and interim head of the department of biopharmaceutical sciences, is testing a drug she helped developed with fellow UI Cancer Center member Greg Thatcher that has the potential to help women whose breast cancer has stopped responding to hormone therapy. Patient recruitment into the…

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Peace taking a shot at treating cancer

Vaccines have been developed to fight the flu, combat chicken pox, and battle Hepatitis B. David Peace is working to add cancer to that list of diseases. Peace, MD, a member of the University of Illinois Cancer Center and professor of hematology and oncology at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, is conducting basic and translational research in tumor immunology in hopes of developing vaccines to treat numerous cancers, including prostate, kidney…

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Protein-Protein Interactions could lead to new cancer treatments

Molecules being developed by Terry Moore could one day make a big impact on the lives of individuals fighting breast cancer. Moore, PhD, University of Illinois Cancer Center member and assistant professor of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy in the UIC College of Pharmacy, is using a new method involving protein-protein interactions to target estrogen receptors that have become resistant to tamoxifen, a commonly used treatment for early and advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.…

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To Goldberg, cancer had a silver lining

Sandy Goldberg will never forget her mother, Evelyn. Neither will thousands of other women. Women entering the mammography clinic at the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System (UI Health) are greeted by a plaque and photograph of the late Evelyn Goldberg. They may not be aware of who she is, but Evelyn Goldberg taught her daughter Sandy, a Chicago television personality and clinical nutritionist, to help others, and through a partnership…

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New grant to learn if the gene selenof contributes to prostate cancer

Caucasian men accounted for about 106 new cases of prostate cancer per 100,000 men for the years 2011-2015. For African American men, that number jumped to nearly 179 per 100,000. University of Illinois Cancer Center member Alan Diamond has received a U.S. Department of Defense grant to study the accuracy of his hypothesis that the gene SELENOF is a contributing factor in the disparity. The combination of genetics and environmental factors likely play…

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Lack of vitamin D could play a role in prostate cancer in African American men

University of Illinois Cancer Center member Larisa Nonn has received a three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to conduct research to determine whether the lack of vitamin D in African American men increases the amount of testosterone and estrogen within the prostate, leading to a higher risk of cancer. “Although the disparity of vitamin D deficiency in African Americans is well known, the clinical significance is often questioned because African American…

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Brigade bringing together patients, researchers to find cure

Rosemarie Rogers could only laugh. That’s not the usual response a doctor hears when informing a patient she has been diagnosed with breast cancer. But when Rogers’ doctor told her that her friend – who accompanied her to the appointment – had to drive her home, laughter was all he heard. The doctor, Rogers said, looked at her quizzically. “My friend can’t drive,” said Rogers, who after 22 years still laughs at the…

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Meet our team- Dr.Susan Hong

An estimated 15.5 million Americans are cancer survivors, but they haven’t beaten the disease alone. It takes a concerted effort to survive cancer, and a new program developed at the University of Illinois Cancer Center is providing patients with the resources they need to help them continue living a full life. “Survivorship begins at the time of cancer diagnosis,” said Dr. Susan Hong, director of the Cancer Center’s Adult Cancer Survivorship Program. “Just…

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